Cost Savings in Social Housing Repairs

For over 21 years local authorities have been saving huge amounts of money in scaffold hire charges by using a range of access equipment purpose designed for ‘hit & run’ housing repairs. Easi-Dec has long been the preferred method of access for the following reasons:

 

Cost Savings: Almost total independence from the need for scaffold hire on external work which would often have cost more than the value of the work being done
AND no invoices to authorise payment for.


Independence: Means having the facility to draw the correct equipment out of your stores at a minutes notice, pop it onto your van and be out on site and working in no time at all AND have your own team erect full elevation access in less than 30 minutes.


Fast pay back: OK, we’ll all agree it’s quite expensive but its the best you can get and the average payback period compared to scaffolding hire is between 12 and 15 jobs depending upon size. See our website for painless payment options and like Easi-Dec they’re purpose designed for local authorities.


Peace of mind: Got grumpy tenants? Not with Easi-Dec you haven’t. Unlike scaffolding, our system takes only 10-15 minutes to remove or relocate. As we all know, scaffolding is hugely unpopular with tenants from both the security and safety aspects. Easi-Dec is gone in a few minutes and so have potential problems like these.


Safety: It’s all taken care of when you use purpose designed equipment and training provided by Easi-Dec. Our systems are so simple to use we can train your staff either at our factory in Bedfordshire or better still, on site. Training takes about 4 hours and is free on site. Certificates of competency are award to your staff upon training.


Product quality: All Easi-Dec products are manufactured to the ultimate quality and are guaranteed for three years. Our nationwide Sales Engineers offer free inspections on a site monthly basis to all our customers. Where relevant, all Easi-Dec products are manufactured to both British and EU standards.

 

This article was originally published in HA Magazine in August 2011